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Archive for May, 2009

In the course of his ministry at Tulsa University Vicar Chris met Austin Hines, a recent graduate who will begin a graduate degree at Texas A & M. He produces videos and such through his own business, FutureLight Studios. He met with us and filmed at Grace over a couple day period and produced this video along with several others.

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Pastor M. Beecroft, 05/21/2009

In our Holy Gospel, St. Luke tells us the departure of Jesus is a source of great joy for the disciples. Jesus leaves and they are even giddy. Now why would they be so happy about Jesus leaving them? Isn’t it supposed to be hard to say good-bye? Or maybe they were just glad to be out from under His watchful eye, like children going off to college, happy to be on their own. “Finally, Jesus is gone and we can do what we want. No more Jesus pointing out our sins and telling us what is right and wrong.” Of course this is not why the disciples were filled with joy, but there are many who would be happy to see Jesus leave the building for exactly that reason and a few others….

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Pastor M. Beecroft, 05/21/2009

There was a real possibility the disciples might fall away. Jesus’ crucifixion was at hand and His death would make it appear that all was lost; that evil itself had triumphed. Judas had already fallen, doing the bidding of Satan by betraying Jesus to the authorities. Peter, over-confidant, foolishly bragging that he would suffer even death for Jesus, would deny Him three times before the morning. The disciples did not understand the gravity of the events that were about to transpire. They did not know what the immediate future held for them. The sham trial; the beatings and mocking of Jesus; His crucifixion and death. Witnessing those events alone might lead them to question their faith in Jesus; to consider returning to their old lives, taking up their fishing nets and calling it quits. So Jesus speaks words of comfort to them about the promise of the Holy Spirit. He speaks to them of a future beyond the immediate shock of what they would witness over those next several days…

 

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Vicar Chris Tiews, 05/17/2009

It was the coldest, loneliest, and most frightening night the 705 men, women, and children had ever experienced.
Floating in the middle of the North Atlantic, shivering in lifeboats—or in some cases, even straddling overturned ones…
By now, the panicked cries of the dying were few and far between because anyone floating in the icy water had already succumbed to hypothermia and had slipped beneath the waves.

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Read it Sermon, May 17, 2009

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Pastor Beecroft, 05/17/2009

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Vicar Chris Tiews, 05/14/2009

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Pastor M. Beecroft, 05/10/2009

Our Lord Jesus Christ has told the disciples that He is going to leave them. The news of this impending separation brings a profound sadness to the disciples and sorrow fills their heart.

I imagine their sorrow might have been similar to a mother dropping off her child on the first day of school. Of course this is the high holy festival of Mother’s Day so here is the expected illustration. When I was young, there were no preschools or Mother’s Day Out programs. I was with my mother almost constantly from the time of my birth until I entered half-day Kindergarten. So when the day to start school finally came around, there were more than a few tears. My mother said I threw a fit and cried uncontrollably. I had never really been apart from her. All I knew in my short life was being at home with mom. So being dropped off at a new place filled with strangers was a bit traumatic. My mother also wept. Sending her son, her first child, off to school for the first day marked a significant transition. Once school started, things would never be the same. While a measure of separation between mother and child is inevitable, and even necessary, it is usually a source of sorrow and sadness. Now when my mother dropped me off at college as a 17-year old freshman, untold joy, elation and relief replaced sorrow. I had been far from a compliant, obedient son. So as we approached the dormitory, the car barely slowed down, and, if I remember correctly, she shoved me out the door along with my stuff. There is a qualitative difference between a four-year old boy and a seventeen-year old punk, even in a mother’s eyes. The sorrow of separation she felt at Kindergarten was a distant memory.

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